An ethiopian journey towards a tragedy

The first officer on the flight was Yonas Mekuria The flight was diverted to Nairobi after two hijackers with hand grenades entered the cockpit.

An ethiopian journey towards a tragedy

Share via Email People wait for a bus in Addis Ababa. The government has launched an ambitious modernisation plan in the Ethiopian capital. The changes that have taken place in Ethiopia since the famine are commendable.

One effect of the progress is a greater capacity to cope with drought, preventing the descent into famine conditions that have occurred in the past. Changes are equally visible in trade and investment.

Exports have diversified and the country has become a major shipper of oil seeds, flowers, gold and, increasingly, textiles and leather products. This has been enabled by a steady growth in foreign investment, particularly into floriculture and manufacturing. The spectacular change in Ethiopia has been enabled by the relative peace and stability it has enjoyed over the past two decades, which in turn has allowed its regional diplomatic influence to increase.

Although there are still low-level insurgencies in some parts of the country, the ruling coalition has generally governed effectively. Yet unlike nations such as Singapore and China, whose economic transformation occurred within a closed political system, the EPRDF operates in what is formally a liberal democracy.

This ideological entanglement has created structural tension, evident in the restrictions on political and civil rights that are, in theory, enshrined in the constitution.

Growing economic inequality also threatens to undermine the political stability and popular legitimacy that a developmental state acutely needs. Who benefits from economic growth is a much-contested issue in contemporary Ethiopia. Although the government argues that the suffering caused by rapidly rising living costs is a transient phenomenon inherent in developing economies, the emergence of new economic elites through rentier activity and clientelism has exacerbated the sense of relative deprivation, particularly among urban poor people.

These peripheral areas - such as South Omo and the Afar region - are where ethnic minorities with a weaker political voice live.

Whether Ethiopia will attain its ambitious goal of becoming a middle-income country in the next decade depends how it manages the transition from public investment-driven growth to a dynamic, private sector-heavy model.

It will also hinge upon its attempts to mitigate the many political and social costs of the transition.Aden, Yemen, August 11/ – Ethiopian migrants were violently forced into the sea off Yemen’s coast this morning (10/08). This comes one day after the presumed death of 50 Ethiopian and Somali migrants during a similar incident.

Opinion - "Why I'm coming back home to Ethiopia after 16 years in exile" was the headline of an article on AlJazeera written by a an Ethiopian Oromo seasoned journalist and political analyst Mohammed Ademo on announcing his long overdue home coming. Once a darling of investors and development economists, repressive Ethiopia is sliding towards chaos.

It was meant to have been a time for celebration. When on October 5th the Ethiopian government unveiled the country’s new $ billion railway line connecting the capital, Addis Ababa, to Djibouti, on the Red Sea, it was intended to be a shiny advertisement for the government’s ambitious.

As with yesterday, this tragedy took place off the coast of Shabwa, a Yemeni Governorate along the Arabian Sea – although in a different location and closer to the Aden – Ethiopian migrants were violently forced into the sea off Yemen’s coast this morning (10/08).

Addis Abeba, July 11/“Why I’m coming back home to Ethiopia after 16 years in exile” was the headline of an article on AlJazeera written by a an Ethiopian Oromo seasoned journalist and political analyst Mohammed Ademo on announcing his long overdue home coming. “I want to witness firsthand how my country is undergoing massive change which was unthinkable just a few months ago,” .

An ethiopian journey towards a tragedy

From that point forward, I embarked upon a rocky and harsh journey towards safety. After several days of hardship and uncertainty, I eventually arrived in Dadaab refugee camp; the world’s largest refugee camp located in Kenya.

Ethiopia | Awards | LibraryThing